Wonderful Machine

Welcome to our Tumblr page. Here we'll share photos and projects from our member photographers. To read our in depth features, visit the daily blog at www.blog.wonderfulmachine.com
To the knowledge of the average person, neonatal organ donation is impossible. And although it’s rare, with just 21 donors less than 1 week old between 2008-2013, it’s actually growing in popularity. In May of 2012, Ohio native Deanna Slifka and her family helped to shed light on this rare procedure after her baby girl was stillborn. Although Dianna was surprised to receive the call about neonatal donation, she thought twice about it and then simply said, “yes.”
The Littlest Donors. Photo by Ricky Rhodes.

To the knowledge of the average person, neonatal organ donation is impossible. And although it’s rare, with just 21 donors less than 1 week old between 2008-2013, it’s actually growing in popularity. In May of 2012, Ohio native Deanna Slifka and her family helped to shed light on this rare procedure after her baby girl was stillborn. Although Dianna was surprised to receive the call about neonatal donation, she thought twice about it and then simply said, “yes.”

The Littlest Donors. Photo by Ricky Rhodes.

As Dan Bannister says in his recent sketchbook promo The Assistants, "Photography is 1% talent and 99% moving furniture."

Assistants perform this vital task as well as so many others, including light tests and standing in for models. Over the years, Dan realized that this can result in “funny moments with bored or under-caffeinated assistants trying to emulate models and subjects.”

Using these tests and finished shots, Dan created a sketchbook as a promo as well as a thank you to his crew and assistants.

View a video of the finished piece here:

http://vimeo.com/86801999

Wish you were here… new work from Jeremiah Watt, on spec for Patagonia in Spain.

Mud bath. An American Photography 30 chosen image by Chris Sorensen.

Mud bath. An American Photography 30 chosen image by Chris Sorensen.

Wat Bang Phra Tattoo Festival: Wat Bang Phra, Thailand

Volunteer medics try to keep the area clear and warn people of impending charges but inevitably a photographer who hasn’t been there before stops to look at the back of the camera to see if they got a picture. They usually stop to admire their work right before the charging monkey or tiger decks them. Covering the tattoo festival requires excellent situational awareness. It’s hot, crowded, noisy and very easy to get hurt if you’re not careful. I’ve seen photographers leave the ceremony with broken bones or carried away by medics. It’s also very hard to keep other photographers out of your photos. - Photojournalist Jack Kurtz